FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Flights

Before, after and during flights. The Do's & Don'ts, so you know what to do when you need to do it.

Travel

location, location, location the big question and funding your trip

luggage

What to pack and how to pack it, some answers to those burning questions.

Flights

We’ve been taught to fear the interference of our portable devices and an airplane’s sensitive electronic systems. And despite being told to turn off our darn phones, four out of ten passengers, it seems, disregard these warnings, since there’s little hard evidence behind claims that electromagnetic emissions from devices can muddle airplane computers. Still, there’s ample anecdotal corroboration, like the flight where a 30-degree navigation error was rectified simply by asking a passenger to turn off a portable DVD player. The issue is still being debated, so if in doubt, flick that Off switch. We might, eventually, long for the days when a chatty seatmate couldn’t make an hour-long phone call.

Many are surprised to know that most of the liability on the part of an airline is contractual and there is no specific law or regulation in place regarding refunds or rebookings. While most airlines will rebook you on the earliest flight possible after a cancellation, and usually at no additional charge, they are not required to do so by law. Some airlines may also allow you to book a flight on another airline and then transfer the value of your ticket over to the other company in a process called “endorsing,” this is also an optional business practice.

Each airline has its own policies about what it will do for cancellations and delays. While many believe that airlines are legally obligated to provide food or lodging in these instances, they are not. However, a few situations are covered by law.

The days of relying on an amenable attitude and a smile to score a cushy seat are, sadly, over. But some strategies still work: First, fly often and use miles whenever you can. And never underestimate the power of a good old-fashioned complaint when an airline overbooks your flight.

Travel

We’re all keen to explore countries and destinations that are unspoiled or unexpected, even if we’re probably still subconsciously following trends. (This year, Myanmar, Mozambique’s Bazaruto Archipelago, and Sri Lanka are some of our planned far-flung getaways.) But we’d also like to reframe this question: What are some of the best destinations you haven’t heard of in well-known, heavily trafficked cities? Paris, perhaps, or London? Consider somewhere reasonably central, but slightly under the radar—say, Canal St. Martin in Paris and Shoreditch in London. They’re easy to reach and a offer a wonderful “wow”moment of discovery.

Between nine and 11 months in advance of your trip is a good time to act, though if you are looking for summer breaks, the January sales often see exceptional deals being snapped up.

– Well, we certainly don’t recommend Tahiti, where there’s an all-but-constant reminder at every juncture that you are alone, a sad friendless figure lurking amid the glowing honeymooners. There are a few places, though, where visiting solo is a bonus, not a burden: notably cruises, yoga retreats, and treks across Europe.

An Important Note About Safety While Traveling

Don't wear flashy jewelry while traveling, Drink responsibly and try to stay with locals you know, Be smart about your money by purchasing a body wallet, Be aware of popular scams in the country you are going to, Know the phone number for emergency services in your travel destination, Use the right bag - cross body bags are safer to use so definitely invest, use travel locks for your luggage and wrap them at the airport if this service is offered, keep digital copies of your important travel documents, use reputable forms of transport - better safe than sorry, check in with friends and family to let them know your plans incase something happens, always remain aware of your surroundings and always trust your instincts

Luggage

– Don’t forget a small power strip—ideal for sharing a crowded outlet in an airport, and a simple way to keep all devices close by once at a hotel. (Combine that with a Zolt—which powers a laptop and two devices with a charger the size of a lipstick—and it’s even handier.) Keep a photograph of your luggage and passport on your smartphone; lose either of them, and you’ll be grateful for the reference. Pack a scarf—always. And since calling Nespresso coffee is an insult to baristas everywhere, the best in-room alternate is the Aeropress, a nifty gizmo that’s portable, light, and makes killer morning joe almost anywhere.

  1. Reusable Masks (Stay Covid-19 safe)
  2. Charging Cords
  3. First Aid Kit (Check in luggage)
  4. Glasses and Contact Lenses
  5. Swimsuit (Beach Holiday)
  6. Universal Travel Adaptor
  7. Reusable Water Bottle
  8. Medications
  9. Book
  10. Headphones
  11. Earplugs
  12. Travel-Sized Toiletries

STEP 1: CHOOSE THE RIGHT TRAVEL BAG FOR YOUR TRIP

STEP 2: ORGANIZE YOUR TRAVEL ESSENTIALS

STEP 3: PACK YOUR TOILETRY BAG

STEP 4: PREPARE YOUR PERSONAL ITEM CARRY-ON BAG

STEP 5: COLLECT IMPORTANT TRAVEL DOCUMENTS, CASH, AND CREDIT CARDS

STEP 6: CONSIDER TRAVEL SECURITY

STEP 7: PREPARE YOUR HOME

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